Aldous Huxley

Submitted by admin on Wed, 09/21/2016 - 11:39

photo of Aldous HuxleyQuotes

  • The propagandist's purpose is to make one set of people forget that certain other sets of people are human.
  • The most shocking fact about war is that its victims and its instruments are individual human beings, and that these individual beings are condemned by the monstrous conventions of politics to murder or be murdered in quarrels not their own.
  • The charm of history and its enigmatic lesson consist in the fact that, from age to age, nothing changes and yet everything is completely different.
  • Orthodoxy is the diehard of the world of thought. It learns not, neither can it forget.
  • All gods are homemade, and it is we who pull their strings, and so, give them the power to pull ours.
  • There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.
  • Maybe this world is another planet's hell.
  • A child-like man is not a man whose development has been arrested; on the contrary, he is a man who has given himself a chance of continuing to develop long after most adults have muffled themselves in the cocoon of middle-aged habit and convention.
  • An intellectual is a person who's found one thing that's more interesting than sex.
  • You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.

Details

Aldous Leonard Huxley was born in Godalming Surrey on 26 July 1894, and died in Los Angeles, California on 22 November 1963, apparently assisted by several large doses of LSD. He was an English writer, novelist, and philosopher, and prominent member of the Huxley family. He graduated from Balliol College, Oxford, with a first in English literature.

He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London; for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug; and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley published short stories and poetry, later, he published travel writing, film stories, and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the U.S., living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. His last book “Island” was a very kind satire on our “culture”.

Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. He later became interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism, in particular universalism. By the end of his life, Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in seven different years.

Huxley had many close friends, including Jiddu Krishnamurti and Igor Stravinsky. Beginning in 1939 and continuing until his death in 1963, Huxley had an extensive association with the Vedanta Society of Southern California, founded and headed by Swami Prabhavananda.

Links

Videos