DH Lawrence

Submitted by admin on Tue, 09/20/2016 - 22:49

photo of DH LawrenceQuotes

  • The Christian fear of the pagan outlook has damaged the whole consciousness of man.
  • It's bad taste to be wise all the time, like being at a perpetual funeral.
  • I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.
  • There is only one thing that a man really wants to do, all his life; and that is, to find his way to his God, his Morning Star, salute his fellow man, and enjoy the woman who has come the long way with him.
  • Creation destroys as it goes, throws down one tree for the rise of another. But ideal mankind would abolish death, multiply itself million upon million, rear up city upon city, save every parasite alive, until the accumulation of mere existence is swollen to a horror.
  • There's always the hyena of morality at the garden gate, and the real wolf at the end of the street.
  • Oh the innocent girl in her maiden teens knows perfectly well what everything means.
  • Never trust the artist. Trust the tale. The proper function of the critic is to save the tale from the artist who created it.
  • Psychoanalysis is out, under a therapeutic disguise, to do away entirely with the moral faculty in man.
  • Myth is an attempt to narrate a whole human experience, of which the purpose is too deep, going too deep in the blood and soul, for mental explanation or description.

Details

David Herbert Richards Lawrence was born in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire on 11 September 1885 and died 2 March 1930. He was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works represent, among other things, an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. Some of the issues Lawrence explores are emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct.

Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile which he called his "savage pilgrimage". At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as, "The greatest imaginative novelist of our generation."Later, the influential Cambridge critic F. R. Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence's fiction within the canonical "great tradition" of the English novel.

Links

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDmfCxDJiLc Anthony Burgess documentary of “The rage of Lawrence”